Baking Man is Baking Bread – the birth of the sourdough

Episode 1 – Making Sourdough

I’m Danish, born and bred, but left Denmark in 1997 becoming an ex-pat.  My initial journey abroad was only meant to last a year, but 23 years later and I’m still abroad.  Many things have happened throughout the two decades, as you can read on my site, and it has been predominantly positive.

A few things that hurts when living abroad and can difficult to overcome; missing my family, friends, and of course (some) Danish food.

Danish food is not exactly exotic or hard to make.  I can make most of the traditional dishes with ingredients from anywhere, using the cookbook my mum gave me when I moved out three decades ago ‘God Mad – let at lave’ (translated to Good Food – easy to make).

However, there are two things I cannot source – not even inside the great nation of the US; proper Danish cheese and rye bread (rugbrød).

I’m not even going to attempt to make Danish cheese, so I have to accept Havarti and other ok cheeses from France.

Rugbrød
example of Danish rye bread – not one I made

The rye bread is also hard to find, although they have some close variations and creations that might give you flavors.  Nowhere near the consistency and nutrition as the Danish rye bread provides.  The Germans offer a close choice, but it is more sour and sticky.  Not great to be honest.

My mum and sister have sent me ready-mixed rye bread packages, but they rarely survived the shipping and too costly to send to the US.

I recently decided to attempt to bake my own rye bread from scratch, including sources the seeds and making my own sourdough.

During my research and hours on Google, I found this amazing recipe from ‘Louise’s Mad Blog‘, and have attempted to translate the recipe into English.

Please note, making this bread from scratch takes roughly a full week, seven days, and the more attention you give the process, the more delicious the bread gets.

Do not rush the process!

I have broken this into two distinct posts, starting with the sourdough.  Please note, this is using metrics and I have attempted to include the US measurements.

Measurements; 1 dl = 0.422 US cup

Depending on the time of the year you are making the sourdough, and temperature in your location, the process could be faster or slower.

Sourdough is a bread made from the natural occurring yeast and bacteria in flour.

I made my batch mid-March, East coast the US, and it took about 7 days to get to the final sourdough stage.

Day 1

  • 1 dl rye flour
  • 1 dl flour
  • 2 dl water
  • Mix the ingredients in a bowl until it becomes a thick paste
  • Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let it sit on the counter

Day 2

  • Add 1/2 dl rye flour
  • Add 1/2 dl flour
  • Add 1 dl of water
  • Gently mix it and set it aside
  • Stir the paste a few times throughout the day

Day 3

  • Add 1/2 dl rye flour
  • Add 1/2 dl flour
  • Add 1 dl of water
  • Gently mix it and set it aside
  • Stir the paste a few times throughout the day

Day 4

  • Add 1/2 dl rye flour
  • Add 1/2 dl flour
  • Add 1 dl of water
  • Gently mix it and set it aside
  • Stir the paste a few times throughout the day

Day 5 and Day 6

    • Ideally, the paste should have started to bobble and smell a little off.
    • Remember to site a few times throughout the day
    • If it ‘falls’ apart, just mix it together again
sourdough
My sourdough, day #1

Once you reach this point, you can move the bowl into the fridge for storage.  It can theoretically survive in the fridge for months.

A tip!   Take the sourdough out from the fridge the day before you need to bake your bread, and “feed” it 1/2 dl rye flour, 1/2 dl flour, and 1 dl water, and let it sit on the kitchen counter overnight.

Patients and time will deliver the best results, and will certainly create better flavors and bread.

 

Stay in touch with me through social media!

  • Tried this recipe? Snap a picture and tag #vikingheartwithin on Instagram.
  • Like my page on Facebook.

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